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  • shlema7 8:29 pm on 04/16/2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: how to sew,   

    How to Sew With Seam Binding – A Quick Way to Finish Edges 

    Many patterns use lining for bodices, blouses, and neck edges. However, some call for finishing the neck edge and/or other edge with seam binding tape. For summer weight clothing, this is often ideal, as you don’t need two layers of fabric to finish the neck edge.

    Some sleeves are hemmed at the edges, but seam binding or bias tape can be used to finish sleeve edges as well. Often sleeveless blouses or jumpers use binding tape to finish the edge, also.

    How To Sew – Sewing Techniques & Tips – CLICK HERE

    Seam binding tape is also known as bias tape. This is a long thin strip of material, “cut on the bias”, which allows the material to sit flat when being sewn along a curve. The material used varies from simple cotton to fancy satins, in very narrow widths to a couple of inches wide, from unfolded to pre-folded, and all the colors of the rainbow.

    Most patterns tell you to cut a length of seam binding tape about 1/2 inch longer than the length of your edge. Then you sew wrong side of binding to wrong side of edge, press the tape over to the right side, and stitch down the middle of it on the right side.

    Another method is to slip the fabric in the crease of the seam binding like a sandwich and sew close to the edge. This is especially quick as you only sew the tape once, rather than twice as in the previous method.

    Using a satin seam binding tape can add a delicate, luxurious touch to your garment. You can use either matching or contrasting color for designer effects.

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  • shlema7 8:27 pm on 04/16/2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Decorative Pillow Cover, how to sew   

    How To Sew An Easy Decorative Pillow Cover 

    Decorative pillows are a quick and easy way to perk up your decor. They can be very expensive to buy, but very easy and inexpensive to sew your own.

    Here is how to sew an easy, decorative pillow cover that takes very little time or effort. Even a beginner can do it!

    This style pillow is sometimes called a “Harem” pillow. It is a different version of the “Knife Edge” pillow.

    This is a great way to dress up and recycle your old knife edge pillows. You can also purchase or make a knife edge pillow liner or form to insert in the Harem cover.

    To make the “Harem” cover, follow these instructions:

    How To Sew – Sewing Techniques & Tips – CLICK HERE

    1. Cut 2 squares or rectangles of fabric the desired pillow size plus 1/2 inch seam allowances all around.

    2. Place right sides together and stitch three sides of the pillow plus around the corners on the fourth side for about 2-1/2 inches on each side leaving an opening in the middle to insert the pillow liner or form.

    Note: You have the option to insert a zipper in the fourth seam or leave the opening to insert the pillow form and hand stitch the opening closed.

    3. Press the seam allowances open

    4. Do not cut or trim the seams or corners.

    5. While the pillow cover is wrong side out, draw a line across each corner on an angle about 2-1/2 inches down from the corner.

    6. While still wrong side out, pinch and gather up the corners with your fingers along the drawn line.

    7. Use string or strong carpet thread to wrap around the pinched corner and tie a secure knot.

    8. Now, turn the cover right side out.

    9. Insert your knife edge pillow liner or form.

    Note: It is not necessary to tie the corners of your knife edge pillow liner.

    10. Close the zipper or slipstitch the opening closed.

    Enjoy your Harem pillow.

    Another idea is to go ahead and turn your pillow cover right side out first and then tie all four corners for a different look. Tie the corners with some decorative cord and tassels.

    Cut up sheets or pillow cases to make your Harem pillows to match your bedroom decor. It adds a real decorator touch!

    If you are artistic, here is your chance to have your accent pillows make a statement in your home. A pillow is the perfect palette to do your creative thing whether it is stitching, painting, photography, or whatever, put it on your pillows.

    Try it! It just makes sense!

     
  • shlema7 8:22 pm on 04/16/2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: how to sew,   

    How to Sew a Princess Seam 

    The princess seam is a tailored delight in jackets, vests, blouses, overcoats, and dresses. It adds feminine shape to a garment without being revealing or clingy. While it comes and goes from style, it is absolutely timeless in its classic look.

    When sewing at home, there are a few challenges with constructing the princess seam. The stiffer the fabric and the deeper the curve the more the challenge. You might try a practice run on a slightly stretchy material to get the hang of it.

    How To Sew – Sewing Techniques & Tips – CLICK HERE

    In order to get the curve, one piece of fabric is “shorter” than the other in the curve area. That’s where the stretch comes in. Also the sewing challenge. Just remember that any curve can be broken down into very small straight lines. That’s your trick to sewing any curve, the princes seam is not an exception.

    Your pattern will come with instructions and illustrations. Here are some tips with the instructions:

    • Cut out your pattern pieces according to instructions.
    • Be sure to mark your pattern by clipping at notches or using Tailor’s chalk.
    • Now you will need to “Stay Stitch” the area of the princess seam. Tip: Don’t skip this part. It keeps the fabric from stretching out the seam during sewing. Machine stitch 1/2 inch (1.3 cm) from raw edge of fabric between notches.
    • Clip to stitching.You’ll see why. Tip: By clipping, we mean hold the scissors with the point towards the stitching and clip from the edge to the stitch, repeat along the curve
    • Match notches of the two pieces (front and side front for example).
    • Okay, now between the notches you have to make the two sides “match”. This is why one side is clipped. Gently pull the clipped side to match the unclipped side.
    • Pin the two sides together. See how one side is sort of “fuller” than the other? This gives the shape to the garment.
    • Now sew at 5/8 inch (1.5 cm) between the notches. Tip: Sew slowly if you need to.
    • Don’t forget to back stitch.
    • Remove pins.
    • Clip curve of seam.
    • Trim the seam down as necessary to press open.
    • Now press open the seam.

     

    A video is worth a thousand pictures, and you can check out a video tutorial online about how to make a princess seam.

    The garments that use a princess seam are many and varied. The shape is especially suited to those long of waist. The time and effort of sewing a princess seam pays off in the classic beauty of the garment.

    How To Sew – Sewing Techniques & Tips – CLICK HERE

     
  • shlema7 1:50 pm on 03/20/2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: how to sew, machine gather, , sewing patterns,   

    How to Sew – Stage Two is Intermediate Skills 

    There are three stages to learning to sew. They are: 1) learning the basics, 2) garment construction skills and repairs and 3) sewing for fun and profit. Your goal is to reach the third stage, where you will enjoy sewing and find that even if you are not a professional seamstress, you are competent to achieve most of the sewing objectives you seek.

    This article will discuss what is needed to master the intermediate stage of learning to sew. A few skills go a long way. As with the beginner stage of learning to sew, it often takes time and patience, but no rocket science. Today you can access information on the internet to help you master these skills.

    1. Practice ripping seams.
    2. Practice finishing seams and pressing them open.
    3. Learn to machine baste.
    4. Learn to gather.
    5. Learn to use seam binding tape.
    6. Learn to read sewing patterns.

     

    Just get comfortable with these 6 skills, and you will be on your way to the advanced stage of learning to sew. Let’s discuss each skill and how you can most easily accomplish it so that you can move on to becoming an advanced sewing student.

    Ripping Seams:

    It’s inevitable, and if you’re good at ripping a seam without ripping apart the fabric, it will make your life easier and your garments more professional. You can use the scraps you sewed straight lines on for practice. Be sure to purchase a good seam ripper.

    If you have established the good habit of back stitching at the beginning and end of your seam, you will find that it is sometimes difficult to get started on ripping the seam at the ends. If this is the case, carefully use the seam ripper on one side of the fabric to cut the thread of the seam on that side. This will give you a hole in the seam where you can now more easily begin to remove the seam.

    The easiest way to rip the seam is to hold the two pieces of fabric apart and find the thread of the seam that holds them together. Carefully insert the seam ripper tip into that thread, not the fabric threads, and slide it in until the thread is cut. Gently pull the fabric pieces apart until they will not pull apart any more. Repeat the seam ripper action. Keep doing this until you have ripped the whole section.

    Practicing finishing seams and pressing them open:

    Pressing your seams as you go makes a world of difference in how well your garment fits and looks. Make this a habit.
    There are numerous ways to finish seams which include serging (not a beginner skill), french seam finishes, and zig zag finishing. Zig zag finishing is particularly easy and quick and looks almost as good at serging.
    To zig zag finish a seam, first press open the seam. Place the edge of the seam under the needle of your machine, and set your stitch width on the widest zig zag. Sew with the edge under the needle, so that the machine stitch closes over the edge of the fabric on one side. There is a video tutorial on this method.

    Learn to machine baste:

    See “How-To-Sew-1—Basic-Machine-Basting” for a full article on machine basting.
    First, locate your stitch length control for your sewing machine. Set the stitch length to the longest length available. Place the seam you want to baste under the needle of your sewing machine, raise the needle to its highest point and lower the presser foot. Do not back stitch when beginning or ending the seam to be basted, as basting is usually removed later. Sew the seam with the long stitch length, then remove the piece from your machine as usual by raising the needle to the highest point, lifting the presser foot, and cutting the threads. This is your basted seam, a temporary seam or the preparation for gathering.

    There is a video tutorial available on the internet for this important skill.

    Learn to machine gather:

    See “How to Sew 2 – Machine Gathering” for a full article on machine gathering.
    To machine baste, set your sewing machine to its longest available stitch length. Stitch this basting stitch along where your seam line will be, on most commercial patterns 5/8 inch from the fabric edge. Stitch again 1/4 of an inch inside the seam allowance. Two lines of stitching will keep your gathering more even, and hold your gather in case one thread breaks. This is especially important on long gathering lengths such as waistline areas. Gently pull up on one thread to gather the material. Evenly distribute the gathering, and finish sewing your seam according to directions. Again, there is a video tutorial for this valuable sewing skill.

    Learn to use seam binding tape:

    See “How to Sew With Seam Binding – A Quick Way to Finish Edges” for a full article on this skill.
    Most patterns tell you to cut a length of seam binding tape about 1/2 inch longer than the length of your edge. Then you sew wrong side of binding to wrong side of edge, press the tape over to the right side, and stitch down the middle of it on the right side.
    Another method is to slip the fabric in the crease of the seam binding like a sandwich and sew close to the edge. This is especially quick as you only sew the tape once, rather than twice as in the previous method.

    Learn to read sewing patterns:

    As with any skill, there is a whole vocabulary you need to know. You already know about basting (not like a turkey!) and gathering. If you search for sewing dictionary on the internet, you will find numerous sites with the terms defined for you.

    Searching for “reading a sewing pattern” will give you results that include videos and ebooks for a full range of help.

    Have no worries, there will always be a new pattern whose instructions stump you at first. Your skills in understanding pattern instructions will grow with time and experience. Don’t sweat it if it still takes you a long time to understand what’s in the pattern right now.

    If you’ve become comfortable with all the other steps in this article, you are ready to become and advanced sewing student.

    Read More Post!

     
  • shlema7 1:49 pm on 03/20/2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: how to sew,   

    How to Sew a Princess Seam 

    The princess seam is a tailored delight in jackets, vests, blouses, overcoats, and dresses. It adds feminine shape to a garment without being revealing or clingy. While it comes and goes from style, it is absolutely timeless in its classic look.

    When sewing at home, there are a few challenges with constructing the princess seam. The stiffer the fabric and the deeper the curve the more the challenge. You might try a practice run on a slightly stretchy material to get the hang of it.

    In order to get the curve, one piece of fabric is “shorter” than the other in the curve area. That’s where the stretch comes in. Also the sewing challenge. Just remember that any curve can be broken down into very small straight lines. That’s your trick to sewing any curve, the princes seam is not an exception.

    Your pattern will come with instructions and illustrations. Here are some tips with the instructions:

    • Cut out your pattern pieces according to instructions.
    • Be sure to mark your pattern by clipping at notches or using Tailor’s chalk.
    • Now you will need to “Stay Stitch” the area of the princess seam. Tip: Don’t skip this part. It keeps the fabric from stretching out the seam during sewing. Machine stitch 1/2 inch (1.3 cm) from raw edge of fabric between notches.
    • Clip to stitching.You’ll see why. Tip: By clipping, we mean hold the scissors with the point towards the stitching and clip from the edge to the stitch, repeat along the curve
    • Match notches of the two pieces (front and side front for example).
    • Okay, now between the notches you have to make the two sides “match”. This is why one side is clipped. Gently pull the clipped side to match the unclipped side.
    • Pin the two sides together. See how one side is sort of “fuller” than the other? This gives the shape to the garment.
    • Now sew at 5/8 inch (1.5 cm) between the notches. Tip: Sew slowly if you need to.
    • Don’t forget to back stitch.
    • Remove pins.
    • Clip curve of seam.
    • Trim the seam down as necessary to press open.
    • Now press open the seam.

     

    A video is worth a thousand pictures, and you can check out a video tutorial online about how to make a princess seam.

    Read More Post!

     
  • shlema7 1:47 pm on 03/20/2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: how to sew,   

    How to Sew 2 – Machine Gathering 

    Gathering is the sewing technique used for many applications in different sewing projects. Ruffles are an example of gathered fabric, as are puffy sleeve caps. Gathering is accomplished by first applying long stitches, called basting, and gently pulling up on the threads to gather the fabric.

    • To machine baste, set your sewing machine to its longest available stitch length.
    • Stitch this basting stitch along where your seam line will be, on most commercial patterns 5/8 inch from the fabric edge.
    • Stitch again 1/4 of an inch inside the seam allowance.
    • Two lines of stitching will keep your gathering more even, and hold your gather in case one thread breaks. This is especially important on long gathering lengths such as waistline areas.
    • Gently pull up on one thread to gather the material.
    • Evenly distribute the gathering, and finish sewing your seam according to directions.

     

    For very thin or slippery fabrics, you may need to use a slightly smaller stitch length to keep your stitches smooth. Always mark your patterns, as you will need to line up the gathered area with particular areas of another piece of your garment. If you don’t have it marked, you won’t know where to match up the pieces.

    When you’re gathering a small area, you can wrap one end of the thread around a pin to keep it anchored in place and prevent the thread from being pulled totally out of your sewing piece.

    Machine gathering is a technique that you’ll use in many sewing patterns. Practice it a few times on fabric scraps until you’re comfortable with the technique, and you’re on your way to more successful sewing projects.

    Robin Brown is a Singer sewing machine fan. She sews regularly for her family and for fun.

    Read More Post!

     
  • shlema7 4:18 pm on 03/17/2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: dress video, how to sew, Sew a Dress, simple dress   

    How to Sew a Dress 

    Once you have a basic knowledge of how to draft a simple pattern and how to draft variations of design for any part of the pattern, you can begin to think of how to sew a dress. In choosing your material you must keep several things in mind. Keep the style you have designed in mind. Remember to judge the material for its suitability as far as season, occasion, and the individual who will wear it is concerned.

    HOW MUCH MATERIAL WILL YOU NEED?

    The dress has been designed, the pattern drafted and cut – every necessary part, facings, bias bindings, pockets, trimmings, etc., have all been cut and marked.

    First decide on width of material to be used, then lay all your pattern pieces on the same width muslin or paper exactly as it will be laid out for the final cutting. Make sure to place all your pattern pieces parallel with the straight of the goods. The amount of material you will need is exactly the amount you have used for laying out your pattern.

    Special planning is required for stripes, plaids, prints, and material with nap. The additional amount of material needed will depend on the style and amount of matching required, and on the size and spacing of the fabric design. Generally fabrics with small designs will require 1/8th yard extra.

    Medium designs, stripes, and small plaids -1/4 yard extra.

    Napped materials, large plaids and large spaced prints will require 1/2 yard or more extra depending on the design and style.

    PREPARING MATERIALS FOR CUTTING

    Before any cutting is to be done the material must be checked for shrinkage control. It is always best to shrink all cottons and woolens whether they have been preshrunk or not. This is best accomplished by immersion in tepid water and pressing dry through a cloth or by pressing the dry material with a damp cloth and steam iron. When pressing be sure to just press and not push the iron back and forth over the material – the latter will only stretch it out of shape.

    Another important thing to know about how to sew a dress is to straighten edges of the material you are going to use. Firm materials can be straightened by clipping selvage and tearing.

    Delicate materials require delicate handling. Some materials are impossible to tear – with these you will have to draw a thread across the material and cut along this guide. Determine which side of the material you want to use as the right side: Washable materials usually come with the right side folded out. Silks and wools usually come with the right side folded in to prevent soiling. Some materials may be used either side – use your own judgment as to which side is more attractive in finish, pattern, weave, etc. Straighten grain of material by stretching on the bias from selvage to selvage. Press out all creases and wrinkles.

    Pin selvages together to make certain the center fold will be directly on the straight of the material. Always fold your right side in. Extra pinning is required for plaids, checks, stripes, and smooth slippery materials to prevent material from crawling and the design from creeping out of alignment.

    When you lay out your material for cutting use a large table. Special cutting boards (folding) are available – these are especially good because they are marked for straight lines and right angles and fabric can be pinned to it to keep it in place.

    CUTTING

    Have all pattern pieces properly marked for straight of goods and for joining points. Place all pattern pieces on your material making certain that the straight of goods marking matches the grain of the material.

    Use sharp, long scissors. Keep material and pattern flat on table. Don’t pick up the material. Let the blade of the scissors lift only enough to enable cutting. Take long, clean strokes.

    Before removing pattern from material, make sure that you have transferred all the markings to the material.

    The first steps in how to make a dress have been taken. Now begins the actual start of your garment making. Good luck!

    Read More Post!

     
  • shlema7 4:16 pm on 03/17/2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: how to sew,   

    How to Sew With Seam Binding – A Quick Way to Finish Edges 

    Many patterns use lining for bodices, blouses, and neck edges. However, some call for finishing the neck edge and/or other edge with seam binding tape. For summer weight clothing, this is often ideal, as you don’t need two layers of fabric to finish the neck edge.

    Some sleeves are hemmed at the edges, but seam binding or bias tape can be used to finish sleeve edges as well. Often sleeveless blouses or jumpers use binding tape to finish the edge, also.

    Seam binding tape is also known as bias tape. This is a long thin strip of material, “cut on the bias”, which allows the material to sit flat when being sewn along a curve. The material used varies from simple cotton to fancy satins, in very narrow widths to a couple of inches wide, from unfolded to pre-folded, and all the colors of the rainbow.

    Most patterns tell you to cut a length of seam binding tape about 1/2 inch longer than the length of your edge. Then you sew wrong side of binding to wrong side of edge, press the tape over to the right side, and stitch down the middle of it on the right side.

    Another method is to slip the fabric in the crease of the seam binding like a sandwich and sew close to the edge. This is especially quick as you only sew the tape once, rather than twice as in the previous method.

    Using a satin seam binding tape can add a delicate, luxurious touch to your garment. You can use either matching or contrasting color for designer effects.

    Read More Post!

     
  • shlema7 4:14 pm on 03/17/2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: how to sew, , , sewing machine,   

    How to Sew 2 – Machine Gathering 

    Gathering is the sewing technique used for many applications in different sewing projects. Ruffles are an example of gathered fabric, as are puffy sleeve caps. Gathering is accomplished by first applying long stitches, called basting, and gently pulling up on the threads to gather the fabric.

     

    • To machine baste, set your sewing machine to its longest available stitch length.
    • Stitch this basting stitch along where your seam line will be, on most commercial patterns 5/8 inch from the fabric edge.
    • Stitch again 1/4 of an inch inside the seam allowance.
    • Two lines of stitching will keep your gathering more even, and hold your gather in case one thread breaks. This is especially important on long gathering lengths such as waistline areas.
    • Gently pull up on one thread to gather the material.
    • Evenly distribute the gathering, and finish sewing your seam according to directions.

     

    For very thin or slippery fabrics, you may need to use a slightly smaller stitch length to keep your stitches smooth. Always mark your patterns, as you will need to line up the gathered area with particular areas of another piece of your garment. If you don’t have it marked, you won’t know where to match up the pieces.

    When you’re gathering a small area, you can wrap one end of the thread around a pin to keep it anchored in place and prevent the thread from being pulled totally out of your sewing piece.

    Machine gathering is a technique that you’ll use in many sewing patterns. Practice it a few times on fabric scraps until you’re comfortable with the technique, and you’re on your way to more successful sewing projects.

    Robin Brown is a Singer sewing machine fan. She sews regularly for her family and for fun.

     

     
  • shlema7 4:13 pm on 03/17/2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 2 Sewing Techniques, how to sew, Reversible, , , techniques   

    2 Sewing Techniques On How To Sew A Reversible Vest 

    Here are two sewing techniques plus some good sewing tips on how to sew a reversible vest or a lined vest. One is stitched and turned; the other is stitched and bound.

    Try both to help you determine your favorite sewing technique.

    For both methods, follow these cutting and sewing instructions:

    Choose similar weight fabrics for a reversible vest.

    Preshrink all fabrics and interfacing.

    Interface the vest with a fusible knit interfacing.

    Test the interfacing on a scrap of fabric first to make sure it will be OK.

    Depending on the fabric, you may choose to interface both of the fronts and back of the vest.

    Note: You may want to interface the fabric and then cut the vest pieces out of the interfaced fabric.

    Carefully cut two fronts and one back from each fabric.

    Make sure the front and back vest pieces are the same size in both fabrics after you cut them out. Lay one over the other to check it.

    Apply any pockets or designs to each front and back layer.

    For each layer:

    Place right sides of the fabric together and stitch the front and back shoulder seams together. Do NOT backstitch.

    Instead begin and end each seam with short stitches (18-20 per inch) for about 1 to 1-1/2 inches.

    Sandwich press the seams.

    Read More Post!

    Press the seams open.

    At the neck and shoulder point of the shoulder seam, trim the shoulder seam allowance back at an angle for about 1-1/2 inch to eliminate bulk when the neck and armhole seams are made.

    Also trim the shoulder seams of one of the layers to be just slightly less than the other layer to stagger or grade the seams when they lay on top of each other.

    Continue with either Method I or Method II to finish the vest.

    Method I – How To Sew To Complete A Stitched And Turned Reversible Vest

    Place the two vests right sides together.

    Note: Generally, when sewing a lined vest, it is a good idea to trim off about 1/8 inch from the lining before attaching it to the outer layer. This keeps the lining from showing on the outside when the vest is worn.

    For a reversible vest, you may or may not want to do this.

    If a bit of one of the layers shows on one of the sides, it may look like narrow piping. You are the designer. Create the look you want.

    Stitch the vests armhole edges together using short stitches (18-20 stitches per inch) all the way.

    Sandwich press these seams.

    Press the seams open.

    Trim the armhole seams to 1/8 inch seam allowance. The short stitches will hold this seam.

    If this is a lined vest, understitch the armhole seams and all of the other seams as well. If it is reversible, you may not want the understitching to show on the edge.

    Sewing Tip: Always use short stitches and trim to 1/8 inch seam allowance to stitch a curve. Then understitch if possible. It produces a much cleaner, sharper curve instead of trimming to 1/4 inch and clipping. Try it!

    After the armholes are finished, place the two right sides of the vest back together again lining up all the edges. Pin to hold the layers.

    Stitch the front and neckline together.

    Begin stitching about 2 inches from the side seam on the bottom of the front and stitch across the bottom of the front, up the center front and around the neck and down on the other side of the front stopping about 2 inches from the other side seam.

    Use a regular stitch length to stitch across the bottom of the front and up the front. Change to a short stitch length to stitch the curve around the neck.

    Sandwich press the seam.

    Press the seam open.

    Trim the curved area around the neck to 1/8 inch.

    Trim the rest of the seam to 1/4 inch.

    Hold the scissors at an angle when you trim to help layer or grade the seam allowances or use “duckbill” scissors to help do this.

    Sewing Tip: Always stagger the edges of seam allowances when they end up laying on top of each other in a finished garment.

    Turn the vest right side out by pulling the fronts through the shoulders one side at a time.

    Press well setting the seam lines exactly on the edge.

    Read More Post!

    With right sides together, match the armhole seams and pin exactly through the stitching line to hold one on top of the other.

    Stitch the side seams of both layers in one continuous step carefully walking the needle over the underarm pin.

    Sandwich press the seam.

    Press the seam open.

    You may want to leave the full seam allowance here in case you have to let the vest out sometime.

    Now, you have the bottom of the back open and about 2 inches on either side of the side seam toward the front.

    Turn right sides together matching up the side seams. Put a pin exactly in the line of stitching in the side seams to hold one on top of the other.

    Starting at one front side where you stopped stitching previously, stitch across the bottom until you come to about 2 inches from the next side seam pin and stop leaving about a 4 inch opening on that side.

    Sandwich press the seam.

    Press the seam open.

    Press under the unstitched seam allowances as though they were stitched.

    Trim and grade the seam allowances to about 1/4 inch.

    Turn the vest right side out through the 4 inch opening at the side lower edge. This opening is better than having the opening in the middle of the center back. It isn’t as noticeable.

    Press well again.

    At the opening, turn in and line up the edges.

    To finish this opening, slip stitch it closed by hand or place a narrow strip of fusible web and fuse it closed.

    If desired, topstitch the vest 1/4 inch from the edges.

    Make buttonholes on both sides of the vest.

    Sew 2 buttons together making a thread shank in between them. Use these double buttons through both buttonholes like cuff links. You can even use 2 different buttons as
    long as they are the same size to fit through the holes.

    Method II

    Another method to finish your reversible vest is to sew each vest with shoulder seams and side seams.

    Place the vests with wrong sides together.

    Stitch 3/4 inch all around the armholes and the outer edges of the vest holding the 2 layers together.

    Trim off 5/8 inch all around.

    Bind all the outside edges either with self fabric, contrasting fabric, or a fold over trim or braid to finish.You can even use a decorative serged edge to finish the vest.

    This is fast and easy!

    It’s your choice. You are the designer!

    Enjoy your vest!

    It just makes sense!

    Read More Post!

     
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